Archive for the ‘Cameron’ tag

Papers draw up party lines

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Old school political partisanship is alive and well in the papers today.

Cameron’s law and order speech captures the attention of the Mail and the Telegraph. Writing in the Telegraph Philip Johnston goes so far as to compare the speech to Tony Blair’s after the murder of Jamie Bulger in 1993: “Fourteen years later it is Mr Cameron’s turn to call for moral rearmament, better discipline, effective policing and a challenge to the popularisation of casual violence”. Hoping to avoid any media distortion, Cameron gives his own write-up of himself in the Daily Mail – and must be heartily gratified by the endorsement he gets from the paper in response (‘At last! Mr Cameron is talking like a Tory’).

The Mirror avoids reporting on the speech directly by going straight for Jack Straw’s rebuttal (‘Cam£6bnSham’). While the Guardian prefers to trumpet its egalitarian credentials and expose the ‘Boardroom Bonanza’ being enjoyed by the UK’s chief executives.

Are the papers drawing up their party lines in readiness for an autumn election?

Perhaps, although if the Sun’s the first to know when an election will be called – as it has been for the last 3 elections – then we’ve got a while to wait. The UK’s biggest selling paper leads today on the frightening news that Amy Winehouse is ‘out of control’ and that her father is worried about her.

Written by Martin Moore

August 29th, 2007 at 8:20 am

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Cameron's media profile in need of a polish

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Today’s Telegraph tells its readers to ‘Post your own obituary online’.
Going by this morning’s Editorial Intelligence debate, ‘Can Cameron Crack it’, the Tory leader should get online quick and write a political obituary for the Conservatives.
Simon Heffer, Peter Kellner and Nick Clegg lined up to tell the audience why Cameron won’t (and can’t) win the next election. Shami Chakrabati didn’t offer a prediction of electoral success / failure but was at a loss to know what Cameron really believed. Only Ed Vaizey defended his chief (as one would hope from an Oxfordshire Tory MP).
More damning even than the panel was Peter Hitchens, whose question from the audience included the caustic comment that the Conservatives were now a ‘ghost brand’ like ‘woodbine cigarettes and the Daily Express’, all of which would soon fade into our collective memory.
Should we care what the so-called ‘commentariat’ have to say about Cameron’s chances? Only if we think the media has a serious impact on people’s political views.
But given Cameron’s recent appointment of Andy Coulson as the Conservative’s director of communications it’s clear he believes it does.
On this showing he’s going to have a job convincing even traditionally conservative titles like the Mail and the Telegraph.

Written by Martin Moore

June 20th, 2007 at 11:58 am

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How can we assess the impact of Blair's withdrawal from Basra…

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…when we have so little context in which to place it? Most newspapers and broadcasters have covered Blair’s announcement in breadth – particularly given the subsequent political repercussions it has had in the US – but very few in depth. By this I mean that there is precious little reporting from the ground in Basra. We know the view from Baghdad, from London, and from Washington, but not, sadly, from the place from which the troops are leaving. We understand from Blair that British troops are constantly under fire, and, from Cameron, that there has been a ‘bleak deterioration in Basra over the last three years’ (via Steve Richards), but we’ve got no picture to compare this against.
The situation across Iraq is catastrophic and this hampers both the movement of journalists and their ability to stay somewhere like Basra long term. And there are already many journalists putting themselves at great risk reporting from inside and around Baghdad – Peter Beaumont in Buquba, Patrick Cockburn, David Loyn, Stephen Farrell, Ned Parker and others.
But it is unfortunate that there don’t seem to be any UK reporters, even embedded, in Basra (please tell me if I’ve missed them).
I suppose we should be grateful that most news reports focused on the withdrawal rather than the news that Prince Harry would serve in Iraq, although The Sun managed both, ’1,600 out, one’s in’ (their focus, online at least, has since shifted)
And talking of news values, after the news about Basra why on earth did The Times decide to lead (its print edition) on a report charting the continuing decline of the institution of marriage (‘Britons fall out of love with marriage’)?

Written by Martin Moore

February 22nd, 2007 at 1:31 pm

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